Sunday, September 5, 2010

Massage Courses - The Costs - How to Fund & How to Minimize Your Financial Burden If Funds Are Tight

Whenever we think of the word 'cost', we most likely assume it is meaning the amount of money something will cost. However, on the other hand, we may possibly be talking about the cost to our own social life or amount of spare time we have. In this article, I am going to explain the monetary costs linked with massage therapist training i.e. precisely what tend to be the expenses linked with the typical massage courses out there.

One of the principal factors associated with massage courses that impacts their costs is their length. Basically, it is common that the lengthier the massage course and the much more in depth the course, the more it will cost. Nevertheless, it is inevitable that you will find a few massage therapy schools that charge in a different way but expect in general to be paying in the region of $1 - 8,000. Good reputation and how flooded a massage college is with applicants can impact term fees also and of course, you also must consider the additional charges.

Sometimes overlooked costs when you are initially preparing for massage therapist training are things such as buying books, a uniform, maybe you need to buy your own massage table, and then what about all your living and travel expenses etc. So, if the expenses are way too high, just what are your options then?

Tuesday, August 31, 2010

Friday, August 20, 2010

Tuesday, August 10, 2010

Saturday, July 31, 2010

Sunday, September 5, 2010

Satisfying Your Clients' Needs

By fully understanding your client's issues, problem areas, and preferred treatment methods, you can be well prepared to address a number of the unique client-specific issues that you will encounter during your career as a massage therapist and will ready you for consistently giving a good massage.

Conduct an Interview

It is always important to speak with your client prior to beginning a massage therapy session, to ensure that you are both on the same page about the expectations for change, focus, and treatment during the massage. Clients may sometimes come in for a deep tissue massage, even if they normally receive a light, relaxing Swedish massage. Techniques that you normally use might not be preferred in a new session, and some clients may want you to focus on their legs and back, even though you normally work on their neck and shoulders. By conducting a thorough interview with your client, you can be sure that you are well informed of their focus areas and expectations, which is essential to providing exceptional service and to giving a good massage.

Before a massage, the clients' interviews are the ideal time to speak about factors that may have led to the problem areas, to help you tailor your massage techniques. If a client comes in complaining about low back pain, find out the history of the pain, and possible causes of the problem. Do they drive often? Is there any past surgery or accident that may have contributed to the pain? What kind of pain is it - a shooting pain that may be linked to a pinched nerve, or general muscle soreness that they want to be addressed during the massage? Clients provide a wealth of information and when you speak with them, you can better prepare for giving a good massage.

Tuesday, August 31, 2010

Friday, August 20, 2010

Tuesday, August 10, 2010

Saturday, July 31, 2010

Sunday, September 5, 2010

Tuesday, August 31, 2010

Friday, August 20, 2010

Tuesday, August 10, 2010

Saturday, July 31, 2010